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Abstract Detail



Genetics/Molecular Biology

Bunyard, Britt A [1].

Amanita mycophagy among the “true flies” (Insecta: Diptera).

The genus Amanita is well-known among the Basidiomycota for their typically large, showy, and ubiquitous mushroom fruitbodies. Additionally, the genus is infamous for being toxic to mammals that consume these mushrooms. While most species of Amanita probably are not toxic, a handful of species are responsible for 95% of the fatal mushroom poisonings in North America and they are feared worldwide. The mode of action of Amanita toxins in mammalian cells is well-known. Paradoxically, many disparate groups of invertebrate animals consume Amanitas, along with other mushrooms, with impunity. True flies (Insecta: Diptera) are among the most successful mycophagous animals; mycophagy has likely arisen many times within the order and is found in several families (Drosophilidae, Chloropidae, Phoridae, Mycetophilidae, Sciaridae, Tipulidae, Cecidomyiidae, and Platypezidae). Recently, tolerance to Amanita toxin (primarily α-amanitin) was elucidated in mycophagous species of Drosophilidae. It is not known how many other groups of Diptera have species tolerant to Amanita toxins and if the same mechanisms are involved as those in the Drosophilidae. The purpose of this study was to find out how widespread Amanita mycophagy is among species of Diptera and to determine if there are feeding preferences for or against members of “toxic” species (e.g. those in Sections Amanita, Lepidella, Phalloidae) and “nontoxic” species (e.g. those in Sections Caesareae and Vaginatae).


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Keywords:
Amanita
Diptera
mycophagy
α-amanitin tolerance.

Presentation Type: Offered Paper - Paper
Session: 12
Location: Room 104 AB/Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center
Date: Tuesday, June 10th, 2014
Time: 11:15 AM
Number: 12004
Abstract ID:17
Candidate for Awards:None


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